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Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class++As the name suggests, ClusterClass and managed topologies are built in two parts.++The idea behind ClusterClass is simple: let’s define the shape of your cluster once, and then reuse it many times, abstracting the complexities and the internals of a Kubernetes cluster away.++![Defining a ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/clusterclass.png)++ClusterClass, at its heart, is a collection of Cluster and Machine templates. You can use it as a “stamp” that can be leveraged to create many clusters of a similar shape.++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: ClusterClass+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster-class+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   controlPlane:+     ref:+       apiVersion: controlplane.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: KubeadmControlPlaneTemplate+       name: high-availability-kcp+     machineInfrastructure:+       ref:+         apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+         kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+         name: controlplane-vsphere-machinetemplate+   workers:+     deployments:+     - class: linux-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: linux-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: linux-vsphere-template+     - class: windows-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: windows-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: windows-vsphere-template+   infrastructure:+     ref:+       apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: VSphereClusterTemplate+       name: vsphere-cluster+```++The possibilities are endless; you can get a default Cluster Class from the community, “off-the shelf” classes from your vendor of choice, “certified” classes from the platform admin in your company, or even create custom ones for advanced scenarios. ++## Managed Topologies++Managed topologies is how you put the power that ClusterClass provides into action.++Given a ClusterClass, you can create many Clusters of a similar shape by providing a single resource, the Cluster.++![Create a Cluster with ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/create-cluster.png)++Here it is an example:++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: Cluster+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   topology:+     class: my-amazing-cluster-class+     version: v1.21.2+     controlPlane:+       replicas: 3+     workers:+       machineDeployments:+       - class: linux-worker+         name: big-pool-of-linux-machines-1+         replicas: 5+       - class: linux-worker+         name: small-pool-of-linux-machines-1+         replicas: 1+       - class: windows-worker+         name: pool-of-windows-machines+         replicas: 3+```++But there is more than simplified cluster creation. Now the Cluster acts as a single control point for your entire topology.++All the power of Cluster API, extensibility, lifecycle automation, stability, all the features required for managing an enterprise grade Kubernetes cluster on the infrastructure provider of your choice are now at your fingertips: you can create your Cluster, add new machines, upgrade to the next Kubernetes version, and all from a single place. ++It is just as simple as it looks!++## What’s next++While the amazing Cluster API community is working hard to deliver the first version of ClusterClass and managed topologies later this year, we are already looking forward to what comes next for the project and its ecosystem.++There are a lot of great ideas and opportunities ahead!++We want to make managed topologies even more powerful and flexible, allowing users to dynamically change bits of a ClusterClass according to the specific needs of a Cluster; this will ensure the same simple and intuitive UX for solving complex problems like e.g. selecting machine image for a specific Kubernetes version and for a specific region of your infrastructure provider, or injecting proxy configurations in the entire Cluster, and so on.++We want to move forward on the path for graduating our API to beta, and ClusterClass & managed topology are already a giant leap in this direction.++Stay tuned for what comes next, and if you have any question, comment or suggestion:++* Chat with us on the Kubernetes [Slack](http://slack.k8s.io/):[#cluster-api](https://kubernetes.slack.com/archives/C8TSNPY4T)+* Join the [sig-cluster-lifecycle](https://groups.google.com/forum/) Google Group to receive calendar invites and gain access to documents
* Join the SIG Cluster Lifecycle [Google Group](https://groups.google.com/g/kubernetes-sig-cluster-lifecycle) to receive calendar invites and gain access to documents
fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.

Does it make sense to write “managed topologies” in italics?

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.

You could also write “SIG Cluster Lifecycle is happy…”

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class++As the name suggests, ClusterClass and managed topologies are built in two parts.++The idea behind ClusterClass is simple: let’s define the shape of your cluster once, and then reuse it many times, abstracting the complexities and the internals of a Kubernetes cluster away.++![Defining a ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/clusterclass.png)++ClusterClass, at its heart, is a collection of Cluster and Machine templates. You can use it as a “stamp” that can be leveraged to create many clusters of a similar shape.++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: ClusterClass+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster-class+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   controlPlane:+     ref:+       apiVersion: controlplane.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: KubeadmControlPlaneTemplate+       name: high-availability-kcp+     machineInfrastructure:+       ref:+         apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+         kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+         name: controlplane-vsphere-machinetemplate+   workers:+     deployments:+     - class: linux-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: linux-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: linux-vsphere-template+     - class: windows-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: windows-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: windows-vsphere-template+   infrastructure:+     ref:+       apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: VSphereClusterTemplate+       name: vsphere-cluster+```++The possibilities are endless; you can get a default Cluster Class from the community, “off-the shelf” classes from your vendor of choice, “certified” classes from the platform admin in your company, or even create custom ones for advanced scenarios. ++## Managed Topologies++Managed topologies is how you put the power that ClusterClass provides into action.++Given a ClusterClass, you can create many Clusters of a similar shape by providing a single resource, the Cluster.++![Create a Cluster with ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/create-cluster.png)++Here it is an example:

(nit)

Here is an example:
fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class++As the name suggests, ClusterClass and managed topologies are built in two parts.++The idea behind ClusterClass is simple: let’s define the shape of your cluster once, and then reuse it many times, abstracting the complexities and the internals of a Kubernetes cluster away.++![Defining a ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/clusterclass.png)++ClusterClass, at its heart, is a collection of Cluster and Machine templates. You can use it as a “stamp” that can be leveraged to create many clusters of a similar shape.++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: ClusterClass+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster-class+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   controlPlane:+     ref:+       apiVersion: controlplane.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: KubeadmControlPlaneTemplate+       name: high-availability-kcp+     machineInfrastructure:+       ref:+         apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+         kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+         name: controlplane-vsphere-machinetemplate+   workers:+     deployments:+     - class: linux-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: linux-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: linux-vsphere-template+     - class: windows-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: windows-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: windows-vsphere-template+   infrastructure:+     ref:+       apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: VSphereClusterTemplate+       name: vsphere-cluster+```++The possibilities are endless; you can get a default Cluster Class from the community, “off-the shelf” classes from your vendor of choice, “certified” classes from the platform admin in your company, or even create custom ones for advanced scenarios. ++## Managed Topologies++Managed topologies is how you put the power that ClusterClass provides into action.
The managed topologies concept lets you put the power that ClusterClass provides into action.

?

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class++As the name suggests, ClusterClass and managed topologies are built in two parts.++The idea behind ClusterClass is simple: let’s define the shape of your cluster once, and then reuse it many times, abstracting the complexities and the internals of a Kubernetes cluster away.++![Defining a ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/clusterclass.png)++ClusterClass, at its heart, is a collection of Cluster and Machine templates. You can use it as a “stamp” that can be leveraged to create many clusters of a similar shape.++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4

nit: in documentation, etc, I like to start YAML documents with ---; it makes it extra clear that the document is YAML.

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class++As the name suggests, ClusterClass and managed topologies are built in two parts.++The idea behind ClusterClass is simple: let’s define the shape of your cluster once, and then reuse it many times, abstracting the complexities and the internals of a Kubernetes cluster away.++![Defining a ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/clusterclass.png)++ClusterClass, at its heart, is a collection of Cluster and Machine templates. You can use it as a “stamp” that can be leveraged to create many clusters of a similar shape.++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: ClusterClass+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster-class+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   controlPlane:+     ref:+       apiVersion: controlplane.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: KubeadmControlPlaneTemplate+       name: high-availability-kcp+     machineInfrastructure:+       ref:+         apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+         kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+         name: controlplane-vsphere-machinetemplate+   workers:+     deployments:+     - class: linux-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: linux-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: linux-vsphere-template+     - class: windows-worker+       template:+         bootstrap:+           ref:+             apiVersion: bootstrap.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: KubeadmConfigTemplate+             name: windows-bootstrap+         infrastructure:+           ref:+             apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+             kind: VSphereMachineTemplate+             name: windows-vsphere-template+   infrastructure:+     ref:+       apiVersion: infrastructure.cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+       kind: VSphereClusterTemplate+       name: vsphere-cluster+```++The possibilities are endless; you can get a default Cluster Class from the community, “off-the shelf” classes from your vendor of choice, “certified” classes from the platform admin in your company, or even create custom ones for advanced scenarios. ++## Managed Topologies++Managed topologies is how you put the power that ClusterClass provides into action.++Given a ClusterClass, you can create many Clusters of a similar shape by providing a single resource, the Cluster.++![Create a Cluster with ClusterClass](/images/blog/2021-09-21-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies/create-cluster.png)++Here it is an example:++```yaml+apiVersion: cluster.x-k8s.io/v1alpha4+ kind: Cluster+ metadata:+   name: my-amazing-cluster+   namespace: bar+ spec:+   topology:+     class: my-amazing-cluster-class
   topology: # define a managed topology
     class: my-amazing-cluster-class # use the ClusterClass mentioned earlier
fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.

If not linking to Cluster API earlier, link to it here.

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies
slug: capi-clusterclass-and-managed-topologies

What do you think?

fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.++## A little bit of context…++Before getting into the details, let's take a step back and look at the history of Cluster API.++The Cluster API project started three years ago, and the first releases focused on extensibility and implementing a declarative API that allows a seamless experience across infrastructure providers. This was a success with many cloud providers: AWS, Azure, vSphere, Metal3, Digital Ocean, GCP and still counting.++With extensibility addressed, the focus shifted to features, like automatic control plane and etcd management, health based machine remediation, machine rollout strategies and more.++Fast forwarding to 2021, with lots of companies using Cluster API to manage fleets of Kubernetes clusters running workloads in production, the community focused its effort on stabilization of both code, APIs and documentation, and on extensive test signals which inform Kubernetes releases.++With solid foundations in place, and a vibrant and welcoming community that still continues to grow, it was time to plan another iteration on our UX for both new and advanced users. ++Enter ClusterClass and manage topologies, tada!++## Cluster Class
## ClusterClass

or

## ClusterClass API {#ClusterClass}
fabriziopandini

comment created time in 3 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

ClusterClass and managed topologies blog

+---+layout: blog+title: "Introducing ClusterClass and managed topologies in Cluster API"+date: 2021-09-21+slug: clusterclass-and-managed-topologies+---++**Author:** Fabrizio Pandini (VMware)++The Cluster API community is happy to announce the implementation of ClusterClass and managed topologies, a feature that will greatly simplify how you can provision, upgrade, and operate multiple Kubernetes clusters in a declarative way.

I'd link to https://cluster-api.sigs.k8s.io/ or https://cluster-api.sigs.k8s.io/contributing from “Cluster API” or “Cluster API community”. Your call as to which you prefer. A different link would be fine too.

(Why? Because some folks might think that “Cluster API” refers to something more like WG API Expression or SIG API Machinery, and the hyperlink to “Cluster API” helps to highlight that there is a Cluster API that's not those other things).

fabriziopandini

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PullRequestReviewEvent
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Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

add a note re selectorless services and proxy

 Accessing a Service without a selector works the same as if it had a selector. In the example above, traffic is routed to the single endpoint defined in the YAML: `192.0.2.42:9376` (TCP). +{{< note >}}+api-server does not allow proxying to endpoints that are not mapped to pods. Actions such as

nit:

The Kubernetes API server does not allow proxying to endpoints that are not mapped to pods. Actions such as

or, simplifying the logic:

The Kubernetes API server only allow proxyings to endpoints that map to pods. Actions such as

We'd write “API server” or kube-apiserver, but not api-server.

khenidak

comment created time in 19 hours

Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

add a note re selectorless services and proxy

 Accessing a Service without a selector works the same as if it had a selector. In the example above, traffic is routed to the single endpoint defined in the YAML: `192.0.2.42:9376` (TCP). +{{< note >}}+api-server does not allow proxying to endpoints that are not mapped to pods. Actions such as+`kubectl proxy <service-name>` where the service is without a selector will fail due to this +constraint. This is due to security constraint where api-server can be used to proxy to external+endpoints where the caller may not have access to but api-server does. 
constraint.

This restriction avoids the risk of attempted privilege escalation, where a user tries
to proxy via the API server to reach endpoints where the caller may not have access but the API
server does. 

?

khenidak

comment created time in 19 hours

PullRequestReviewEvent
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Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

clarify declarative API in custom controller docs

 When you combine a custom resource with a *custom controller*, custom resources provide a true _declarative API_.  A [declarative API](/docs/concepts/overview/kubernetes-api/)-allows you to _declare_ or specify the desired state of your resource and tries to-keep the current state of Kubernetes objects in sync with the desired state.-The controller interprets the structured data as a record of the user's-desired state, and continually maintains this state.+encourages you to *declare* the desired state of your resource.  This is in+contrast to an imperative API, where you *instruct* a server what to do. The+Kubernetes declarative API model enforces a separation of responsibilities.+You, the Kubernetes user, are responsible for declaring the desired state of

SGTM

jaypipes

comment created time in 21 hours

PullRequestReviewEvent

issue commentkubernetes/website

“Developing and debugging services locally” documents out-of-project tooling

So even if we move this page to a list of third-party tools, we still need to update it to the current version.

Seems fair.

sftim

comment created time in 21 hours

issue commentkubernetes/website

Using Admission Controllers - EventRateLimit

/language en /triage invalid

I don't think the report of an inaccuracy is correct. If that's wrong, we can update this issue accordingly.

serewicz

comment created time in 21 hours

issue commentkubernetes/website

Images are broken

/retitle Kubernetes Release Cycle page images are broken

Tej-Singh-Rana

comment created time in a day

issue commentkubernetes/website

Images are broken

@Tej-Singh-Rana the page we'd expect you to visit is Kubernetes Release Cycle and is rendered with the following warning:

Warning: This content is auto-generated and links may not function. The source of the document is located here.

https://github.com/kubernetes/website/blob/main/content/en/releases/release.md is the source code used to generate that page. As Kubernetes is open source, you get to see details like this if you look for them.

We could improve the import script to also copy images across.

Tej-Singh-Rana

comment created time in a day

pull request commentkubernetes/website

Add recommendation for Deployment when HPA is enabled

/sig autoscaling

jtslear

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Pull request review commentkubernetes/website

Add recommendation for Deployment when HPA is enabled

 stops adjusting the target (and sets the `ScalingActive` Condition on itself to `false`) until you reactivate it by manually adjusting the target's desired replica count or HPA's minimum replica count. +## Recommended Deployment configuration

That could work. How come you don't also need to take special care with StatefulSets though? It might be that I don't clearly understand the shortcoming as it applies to the Deployment API.

jtslear

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pull request commentkubernetes/website

Update “What's next” section of Workloads concept pages

@jihoon-seo would you be willing to review this PR? I'd appreciate feedback on what I've suggested.

sftim

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